Good Service Rules

This time around I thought I’d post something by Ron Kaufman which I believe applies to every business, everywhere. I first attended his “UP Your Service” seminar a couple of years ago and was highly impressed. Went out to the local bookstore and got two of his books. He is the maestro of customer service! He’s based in Singapore and comes ever so often to Malaysia to give his customer service seminars. If you have the chance, go for it. He “opens” your eyes to the little things which matter.

Below is something I’ve extracted from his e-zine. If you want to know how to sign up for his e-zine, scroll all the way down.

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ONE DAY IN AMERICA: Service Rules
by Ron Kaufman

Walking off the plane we got stuck behind two large Americans who
were talking loud, walking slow and had no sense that an entire
planeload of others were stuck behind them. Rule #1: Service is
not just commercial; it’s a way of living that pays attention and
cares about others.

Immigration was fast and polite. How nice for America’s official
representative to greet us in such a friendly fashion. Rule #2:
First impressions are lasting impressions. Make yours count!

The luggage cart had wheels in disrepair. Most of them were like
that. Rule #3: Smiling service is not enough; your product must
work well, too!

The taxi was big, old and rattled all the way to our hotel. The
meter started at $6.50. I mentioned the charge to the driver who
said, “Two dollars to get in, four-fifty to get out. That’s how
it works here.” I wondered how many non-English speakers would
understand his explanation. Rule #4: Good service is using
language your customer understands.

The Hotel Bellman groaned when he saw our three suitcases and
turned to get a baggage trolley. He literally threw my bag from
the trunk to the trolley as I winced. Then he waited for a tip.
Sorry, Rule #5: No one is “entitled” to a tip. Good service
“earns” a tip.

The Concierge was fabulous. If you are ever in Boston, look up
Rob Fournier, Chef Concierge at the Wyndham Boston Hotel. Rule
#6: Good service leads to referrals, which is good for everyone.

We arrived at 2:00pm but check-in was not until 3:00. The check-
in clerk suggested we wait in the Business Center on the 3rd
floor. We went up and found a tiny room with only one chair
available. Back downstairs, we discovered a lovely library on the
ground floor with many comfortable chairs and lighting.

When we checked in at 3:00pm, I asked the clerk why she suggested
we wait in the Business Center instead of the Library. She said
she thought the Business Center was a nice place to sit. I asked
if she had actually ever SEEN it, and she admitted she never had.
I asked how long she’d been working at the hotel and she replied,
“Three months.” Rule #7: Good service requires good product
knowledge. Sending your customer to the wrong product or location
will send them out the door.

The room-service menu was poorly printed and almost impossible to
read. I showed it to the housekeeper who said, “They told me to
put it in the room”. Rule #8: Good service means bringing obvious
problems to someone who can fix them, not just perpetuating the
problem.

I called to reconfirm our campervan reservation and got a
recording: “Leave a message and we will call you back. We value
your business.” They never did call back. Rule #9: Good service
means keeping your promises.

We made a reservation at a campground, but later changed our
travel plans. I called to cancel the reservation and was told
“Our policy is to charge you if you do not cancel within 48
hours.” But I had just made the reservation for that very night!
“Sorry, that’s our policy,” she said. I asked to speak with the
owner, who promptly agreed not to charge me. Rule #10: Good
service means using your common sense.

Service Rules:

#1: Service is a way of living that pays attention and cares
about others.

#2: First impressions are lasting impressions. Make yours count!

#3: Smiling service is not enough; your product must work well,
too!

#4: Good service is using language your customer understands.

#5: No one is “entitled” to a tip. Good service “earns” a tip.

#6: Good service leads to referrals, which is good for everyone.

#7: Good service requires good product knowledge. Sending your
customer to the wrong product or location will send them out the
door.

#8: Good service means bringing obvious problems to someone who
can fix them, not just perpetuating the problem.

#9: Good service means keeping your promises.

#10: Good service means using your common sense.

SERVICE IN AMERICA? Inconsistency Rules.

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For more great stuff, visit www.RonKaufman.com

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